Enter to Win Salvador Dali’s Cookbook


Salvador Dalí. Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí. Courtesy of TASCHEN

Lately it’s been feeling as if we live in a surreal world, from the recent election to newfangled illusory dishes like the raindrop cake. It’s like we exist inside a Salvador Dalí painting. Actually, depending on whom you wanted to win the presidency, you either want to drown your sorrows in comfort food or throw an over-the-top celebration as only a man adorned with a cape, walking stick and upturned waxed moustache like Dalí could. Dalí loved extravagance, and his penchant for opulence is captured in his 1973 cookbook Les Dîners de Gala, which has just been rereleased by TASCHEN. His esoteric guide to cooking has 136 recipes, many illustrated by Dalí, over 12 chapters (one of which is dedicated to aphrodisiacs and another to snails and frogs). Get his timely recipe for Turkey with Roquefort after the jump for a taste.

Young Turkey with Roquefort
Salvador Dalí. Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí from the cookbook Dalí: Les Dîners de Gala © TASCHEN 2016. Reprinted with permission from TASCHEN. All rights reserved.

1 young turkey – 1 white blood sausage
7 ozs of Roquefort cheese
3 “petit-suisses” cheeses-nutmeg
(swiss knight wedges)
1 tablespoon of oil – 1 tablepoon (sic) of flour
3 cups of water – 2 chicken bouillon cubes
2 carrots – 2 onions
10 ozs of Roquefort cheese
6 ozs of breadcrumbs
3 1/2 ozs of corn flour – 1 egg yolk
2 eggs – 1 quart of water
2 tablespoons of breadcrumbs
1 tablespoon of butter

Pick a tender and well-fleshed young turkey. Clean it and pass it through a flame; we are going to stuff it.
In a salad bowl, combine the white blood sausage, Roquefort cheese, “petits-suisses”. Add salt, pepper, and grated nutmeg. Stuff the young turkey; sew up the bird.
In a saucepan, put the tablespoon of oil and in it brown the tablespoon of flour. When it turns light brown, add water, sliced carrots, chicken bouillon and sliced onions. At boiling point, add the bird. Cover and simmer for 1 hour.
At the same time, mash the 10 ounces of Roquefort cheese with breadcrumbs, corn flour, egg yolk, 2 eggs, salt. Blend into a smooth paste.
Bring the quart of water to a boil, add salt. Using a spoon, put the paste into the water (each spoonful should hold about the size of an egg). When the puffs start floating, remove them and drain them on a dish towel. Then roll them in breadcrumbs.
Remove the turkey, strain the gravy, skim the fat off and keep it warm to serve in a gravy-boat.
Place the turkey in a baking dish surrounded with the puffs. At the bottom of the dish put the tablespoon of butter. Bake at – 400 – for 15 minutes. Watch it: the puffs turn golden very quickly, you will have to turn them several times.

Dalí has said that the idea for the drooping clocks in his most-famous painting, “The Persistence of Memory,” came from seeing melting Camembert cheese one summer. Therefore, Dalí’s notoriety actually was born from food.

We’re giving away a copy of Les Dîners de Gala to one lucky reader. All you have to do is flip through our gallery of weird foods from movies, then tell us in the comments which one you find strangest.


Salvador Dalí. Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí. Courtesy of TASCHEN

So, tell us, which of these strange foods from movies do you think is worthy of a Dalí dinner party? You must include your email address in the “Email” field when submitting your comment so we can communicate with you if you’re a winner. (But do not post your email address in the actual body of the comment.)

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Open to legal residents of the 48 contiguous United States and D.C., 21 years or older. Void in Alaska, Hawaii and where prohibited. Ends 10/27/15. Click here for full official rules.

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